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3 good changes to see in ODI Cricket after the 2019 World Cup

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Last Updated on 5 years by Charbel Coorey

3 good changes to see in ODI Cricket after the 2019 World Cup

Yes, it is weird to have an article about what should happen after a fast approaching World Cup. Indeed, it promises to be a very competitive tournament, with many fans, myself included, doing their best to predict who will make the Semi Finals.

However, there are elements of ODI Cricket that would be nice to see adjusted for the betterment of the game. Below are three key changes after the 2019 Cricket World Cup that would be good to see.

Also read: My 5 big predictions for World Cup 2019! Which do you think will come true?

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1. Go back to one ball

There should be louder calls to get rid of the extra ball and play with one. This is especially considering how high scoring the World Cup is expected to be. The use of two balls has just about eliminated the art of reverse swing from ODI Cricket, which has helped swing the game well and truly in the batsman’s favour.

Think back to Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis. Or Zaheer Khan. Or Brett Lee. The art of reverse swing is so memorable and makes for a great battle between bat and ball. The death overs period in particular has been weighted significantly in favour of batsmen, given that the ball stops moving after a few overs. Bringing reverse swing back forces batsmen to be more skillful and does not expose fans to robotic-like play, where balls that don’t go for a boundary are the memorable ones. Also, the ball goes softer, which makes six hitting more of a skill than a foregone conclusion.

A concern here is that the ball could be hard to see as the final overs approach. So, bring back the rule where a used, but more visible, ball was brought in after 34 overs.

Changing from just four fielders outside the circle in the last 10 overs back to five was a key change after the 2015 World Cup. It may be wishful thinking, but here’s hoping that one new ball is used soon after the 2019 edition.

3 good changes to see in ODI Cricket after the 2019 World Cup. 2019 Cricket World Cup. 2019 CWC.
Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images: One ball after the 2019 World Cup?

2. Have every ball reviewed by the third umpire

How often do deliveries get sent upstairs when a wicket is taken? Given that many actually turn out to be no balls, one wonders just how many non wicket taking balls are actually no balls. It is a good idea for third umpires to review each delivery to ensure the front line has not been overstepped.

The review each ball does not have to be visible to the public unless a wicket is taken. If a no ball occurs, the third umpire can notify the on-field umpire and it can then be called. The third umpire stepping in has two key benefits:

  • The on-field umpire can focus on what happens after the ball is delivered instead of having to look down then up very quickly.
  • Potential free-hits are missed out on if the on-field umpire misses a no-ball on a non wicket-taking delivery.
3 good changes to see in ODI Cricket after the 2019 World Cup. 2019 Cricket World Cup. 2019 CWC.
Will there be better management of no balls after the 2019 World Cup?

3. More opportunities for Associate nations

Associate nations are already fighting at the bit for greater opportunities. A 10-team World Cup does little to help grow the game long term. Instead, it keeps fantastic cricketers away from the spotlight they deserve.

The ICC had two choices: 1. Cut down World Cup participants or 2. Help ensure Associate nations get more opportunities against higher ranked Full Member nations in between World Cups. Unfortunately, the first proved true, with heartbreak a common theme at the World Cup Qualifiers in Zimbabwe last year.

Associate nations need more opportunities in the four-year window between World Cups. Otherwise, how will they continue to grow? It is unfair to expect them to rock up to a World Cup and be competitive with little exposure. The ODI League might make it a little difficult, but here’s hoping that Associate nations such as Scotland get the opportunities they deserve after this tournament, so that the long-term, global aspirations of this great game are in good shape. A move away from a 10-team World Cup would be ideal, but with this format already locked in for 2023, it seems wishful thinking.

3 good changes to see in ODI Cricket after the 2019 World Cup. 2019 Cricket World Cup. 2019 CWC.
No Scotland in the 2019 World Cup: What does the future look like for them?

Are there any changes you would like to see? Drop a comment!

Thanks for reading!

Also read: Five players to watch out for in the 2019 Cricket World Cup

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Charbel Coorey
Charbel Cooreyhttps://cricblog.net
Charbel is the owner & founder of cricblog.net, based in Sydney, Australia. He started the website to fulfill his love for the game of cricket. Charbel has been featured on other publications including OP India, Times of India, and The Roar, among others. He is also a keen fantasy sports player. Charbel has also had the privilege of interviewing cricketers on the CricBlog TV YouTube channel, including James Neesham, Rassie van der Dussen, Andrew Tye, Shreyas Gopal, Jaydev Unadkat and Saurabh Netravalkar: https://www.youtube.com/@cricblogtv For any story tips or questions, you can contact Charbel at charbelcoorey@cricblog.net.

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